biocanvas
biocanvas:

Prostate cancer masses
Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed type of cancer (skin cancer is first), and 15% of men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point during their lifetime. Research has long used cancer cell lines growing on a flat surface to study abnormal cell behavior, but cells on a 2D surface differ considerably from the 3D structure of tissues and tumors as they exist in the body. Recent research has moved towards studying cancer cell lines in a 3D matrix model, allowing scientists to reveal the complex interactions that better mimic tumor growth and dynamics as they actually occur in tissues.
Image by Dr. Louisa Windus, Griffith University, Australia.

biocanvas:

Prostate cancer masses

Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed type of cancer (skin cancer is first), and 15% of men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point during their lifetime. Research has long used cancer cell lines growing on a flat surface to study abnormal cell behavior, but cells on a 2D surface differ considerably from the 3D structure of tissues and tumors as they exist in the body. Recent research has moved towards studying cancer cell lines in a 3D matrix model, allowing scientists to reveal the complex interactions that better mimic tumor growth and dynamics as they actually occur in tissues.

Image by Dr. Louisa Windus, Griffith University, Australia.

nubbsgalore

nubbsgalore:

male mouthbrooding jawfish — such as the mottled (seen in the fourth photo with spikes on the side of its head from a fireworm attack), the yellowhead, the banded, and the cardinalfish seen here —  use their mouths to protect their eggs until the fry hatch. 

mouthbrooding fish are able to produce smaller numbers of offspring with a higher chance of survival than species that offer no broodcare. the males, however, are not able to eat during this period of incubation (which can last anywhere from one to three weeks), but will open their mouths, spitting the eggs out and then sucking them back in to keep them clean and aerated. 

photos by (click pic) nicolas terryshigeru harazaki, steven kovacs, keri wilk, michael patrick oneilll and marcello di francesco 

sinobug
sinobug:

Man-faced Shield Bug (Catacanthus incarnatus, Pentatomidae)  These large true bugs occur in four bright colour morphs: red, orange, yellow and cream with dark eye spots on their and/or forewings, advertising their noxious taste and also perhaps functioning as eyespots to mislead predators. Overall, the spotted pattern resembles a man’s face when one views the bug oriented with the head downwards (I can see you tilting your head).  by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr. Pu’er, Yunnan, China  See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Man-faced Shield Bug (Catacanthus incarnatus, Pentatomidae)

These large true bugs occur in four bright colour morphs: red, orange, yellow and cream with dark eye spots on their and/or forewings, advertising their noxious taste and also perhaps functioning as eyespots to mislead predators. Overall, the spotted pattern resembles a man’s face when one views the bug oriented with the head downwards (I can see you tilting your head).

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..